Protect Pets and Common Areas from Parasite

DDog Bathogs and cats can be great companions, but they also can carry fleas, ticks and parasites into your home and our community. Infestations can spread quickly through a community when flea-infested carpeting or pet bedding is disposed of improperly, when a flea-infested pet plays with your pet and when pet waste is left uncollected on common areas.

 

Help avoid harmful pests in your home and community with the following tips, and follow up with your veterinarian to learn more about other ways to prevent and treat outbreaks.

 

  • Apply a topical flea and tick pesticide. Fleas lay 40 to 50 eggs a day. Unless a pesticide kills 95 percent of the fleas, you won’t eliminate the problem. To do this, you need to use the products sold by your veterinarian. Over-the-counter products just aren’t strong or effective enough. Monthly applications will help keep pets healthy even when they’re exposed to parasites—including mosquitos and mites.

 

  • Always leash your pet. Although you may trust your pets to obey commands, keeping them leashed lessens the likelihood they’ll be infected by other pets and wildlife.

 

  • Keep your pet clean. Even indoor pets should be inspected for ticks and flea “dirt,” which looks like pepper at the base of the coat on the skin. An occasional bath with flea shampoo is a good idea as well. Visit your local pet store or grooming facility or check online for information on bathing routines and options that are best for your pet.

 

  • Monitor your pet’s behavior. Scratching is your first indication that fleas have discovered your dog or cat. Apply a topical pesticide immediately. Fleas, ticks and mosquitos carry potentially life threatening pathogens, so pets can experience a wide range of symptoms if infected; be suspicious of changes in behavior and discuss them promptly with your veterinarian.

 

  • Keep the situation contained. Once you’ve treated your pet and your home (and possibly your yard or outdoor surroundings depending on how severe the infestation), keep the pet close to home until the problem is resolved. Wash bedding and toys that may harbor eggs or larvae in hot water. Infested bedding or carpeting should be tightly sealed in plastic bags before disposing to reduce risk of spreading to others.

 

 

Rock the Proxy: Let Your Voice be Heard

Vote

 

We’ve got an election coming up, and even if you’re unable to attend the membership meeting and election, you can still vote by proxy.

 

A proxy is the written authorization that allows one person to appoint another (the proxy holder) to vote on his or her behalf. State law and the association’s governing documents specify that the association can use proxy voting.

 

Why would you use a proxy? Maybe you’re traveling during the election or have other obligations that prevent you from attending the meeting, but you still want your voice to be heard.

 

If you’re interested in using a proxy, the manager or a board member for a proxy form. Cite the name and address of the individual you’re appointing to cast your vote. Then list your name, address and telephone number, and sign and date the form.

 

The association can only accept one proxy form per person, so be sure to fill out your form accurately. By only accepting one official form, the association doesn’t need to check each proxy to determine if it’s legally sufficient. It also eliminates any potential problems if the vote is close.

 

Just be aware that by assigning your proxy to another person, you’ve authorized the proxy holder to vote for you as he or she sees fit. The proxy holder is responsible for voting or abstaining from a vote.

 

Essentially, a proxy is an act of trust—the proxy giver must trust the judgment of the proxy holder. The proxy giver may think the proxy holder will vote for a certain candidate or issue, but the proxy holder isn’t legally bound by that assumption unless it’s written on the proxy form.